Fossil Beds at the east side of Cheviot Hills 

Fossil Beds at the east side of Cheviot Hills 

In 1954/1955, when the hills were being exacavated for the last housing tracts in the Cheviot Hills area, Peter U. Rodda of the UCLA Geology Department noted the fossil deposits.  He described and labeled two Pleistocene epoch formations – naming them after the area's new streets – Anchor Silt (for Anchor Avenue) and Medill Sand (for Medill Place).  In February 1956, soon after Rodda's work was completed, Medill Place north of Beverlywood Street was renamed Krim Drive ; his report includes the distinction. 
  
Anchor Silt  
The older of the two formations, Anchor silt is named from exposures along Anchor Avenue.  Its maximum thickness is 6o feet, and consists largely of massive, buff-colored, fine sands and silts with thin, irregular beds of cobble gravel.  It is well developed north of Beverlywood Street in the cuts between Anchor Avenue and Krim Drive and at the northwest corner of Beverlywood Street and Krim Drive.  Fossils (mostly mollusks) indicate area was submerged in about 150-200 feet of water cooler than 50 degrees Fahrenheit during the lower Pleistocene age. 

The Anchor silt appears to have been uplifted and eroded prior to deposition of the Medill sand.  The position of the Castle Heights area along the Newport-Inglewood uplift easily accounts for the vertical movement and possibly accounts also for some of the contorted bedding locally present in the Anchor silt.  Then again, it might also be attributed to "submarine slumping."


Medill Sand
This formation, named from exposures along, and adjacent to, Medill Place, is a mixture of fine to coarse sand and gravel.  It has a maximum thickness of near 6o feet and was well exposed north and south of Beverlywood Street.  The irregular pockets of gravel consist of well rounded metamorphic and granitic cobbles and boulders up to 15 inches in diameter.  White siliceous shale fragments, so common in the gravelly sections of the Anchor silt, are not present in the Medill gravels.  These Medill gravels have a fine to coarse, gray-brown, sandy matrix, and have a maximum thickness of about 10 feet, though the thickness and lateral extent vary greatly from place to place.  The single fossil bed in the Medill sand is in coarse grayish sand at an elevation of about 220 feet, and is exposed along the east-facing cuts for a distance of 500 feet, from Girla Way north toward Beverlywood Street.
 
The fauna of the Medill sand is much smaller, and is somewhat better preserved than that of the Anchor silt.  This upper Pleistocene epoch fauna has a warm-water aspect.  It most probably represents bay habitat, suggesting conditions similar to those existing in the Newport Lagoon, Orange County, California, though probably warmer.  

Presumably the edge of the later bay was at a point between the two formations.

Click HERE to download the full PDF version of Peter Rodda's manuscript, "Paleontology and Stratigraphy of Some Marine Pleistocene Deposits in Northwest Los Angeles Basin, California," published in the November 1957 Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.